Latest Updates

10/2016 - Added three new nalbinding stithces (Tabs Turning Stitches and Other Nalbinding Stitches)

6/2016 - Added link to Hanna Martikainen's Master's Thesis (About Nalbinding / Magazines, Theses, and other)

7/2015 - Added 34 new nalbinding videos, and new stitch types.

4/2015 - Added links to Laura Hämäri's Master's Thesis, and Vajanto's and Lipkin's articles (Home / Links to other websites)

3/2015 - Added new stitch
FS 3+1, variant, "Nemi's Back Weave"

3/2015 - Added new stitch Finnish Stitch 2+1 plaited edge Räisälä

8/2014 - Updated pdf instructions, now in English ("For Newcomers")

Nalbinding

In this website you can find nalbinding videos, and instructions on how to make nalbinding mittens.

"In the past years nalbinding has become a 'fashionable' hobby"


- Toini-Inkeri Kaukonen,
56 years ago (1960)

Visitors

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Finnish Stitch 1+2, M1  (Kaukola Kekomäki)


Kaukola Kekomäki (in Carelian Isthmus, former Finland; area belongs to Russia since 1940)

Hansenin koodi
UOO/UUOO Mid-1 (M1)

Video link below photo

n_kaukola-2.jpg

Finnish Stitch 1+2 (under 1, over2) 
Follow the loop on the far right clockwise:
under-over-over - direction of yarn changes - under-under-over-over
UOO/UUOO
Needles show how to do the connection stitch (M1)
(Stitch done based on the diagrams in Kaukonen's article 1960)



Video (link)

Two fragments of nalbinding, in three-coloured stripes, made with this stitch type, were found in Kaukola Kekomäki, ab. 1200 CE (in Carelian Isthmus, former Finland; area belongs to Russia since 1940; (map). Otherwise similar as the Finnish Stitch 1+2, but the connection stitch is not the more common F1, but M1. Needles on the photo above show how to do the connection stitch M1.

You can read more about the Finnish Stitch Family on page Stitch Grouping by Toini-Inkeri Kaukonen (link).

An original nalbinding fragment from Kaukola Kekomäki (about 1200 CE) is on display in the National Museum in Helsinki (Finland). The size of the fragment is not much larger than a matchbox. On one end, it is about 3 fingers wide, and on the other end about 2 fingers wide, and the lenght is about 4 fingers wide. The yarn used in the fragment(s) is thin, and the visible part of the colour stripes is about 4 mm (photo (page 27, photo 12).

 

kaukola_002.jpg




 




Front side. A darning needle was used, and the stitches were pulled smaller in the air between thumb and forefinger.

The stitch is done based on the diagrams in Kaukonen's article 1960.








 

kaukola_004.jpg

 

 

Reverse side.